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Recognising and Promoting Positive Safety Behaviour

Recognising and Promoting Positive Safety Behaviour

For employers there is a legal duty to provide a safe place of work for their employees wherever the place of work maybe. In these COVID-19 times this can and does in many cases mean remote working from home. Health and Safety requires all the stake holders to actively participate in safe work practice and to understand what is involved to create a safe place to work. Giving staff the information and tools to do this is a first step. When on-boarding staff, it is important to carry out a risk assessment that is personal to the employee and their role. Making sure they have the correct training, and any necessary certification is the next step and thereafter the employer needs to monitor compliance and performance.

 

Chair in Office

Office Ergonomics

 

An effective way of doing this is through an online solution that provides the records and training required. Having such a system that provides 24/7 access to information you can then go further to promote positive safety behaviour. By encouraging ongoing engagement with the core safety information and training you can see which employees are performing well and keeping engaged and up to date. You can incentivise staff to make sure they are aware of safe behaviour and you can encourage them to report unsafe issues that may arise.

It is true that a safe place of work is likely to be a more productive environment for the employee which all contributes to your bottom line. Promoting positive safety behaviour will reduce the risk of accidents and incidents and will reduce days lost to illness or accidents. It will also help you protect your company from the negative publicity and potential legal action arising from an accident in the workplace. Everyone in a working environment requires knowledge and training on safety behaviour and how to ensure a safe and healthy workplace. A desk bound job requires proper ergonomics and knowledge regarding breaks and what to do in an emergency. Even working in the home carries significant risks if a workstation is not correctly set up.

Our pattern and location of work is changing rapidly as a result of the pandemic and is likely to change permanently with a much larger degree of blended work where people attend the office on a part time basis. In this scenario it will become increasingly important to promote positive safety behaviour as the employer will have less control of the work environment while still being legally responsible for it. Even more reason to recognise and promote positive safety behaviour.

Myelearnsafety.com can provide more information on this topic as well as providing a solution to safety training and compliance monitoring. We would be delighted to hear from you with any of your concerns or problems.

Article  by Vincent Traynor

Please feel free to contact Cormac on 01 278 1938 or cormac@elearn.ie,  if you would like to discuss your health and safety needs further,  or take advantage of a complimentary course.

Are you safe at work?

Safety in the workplace

Work at height means working in a place (except a staircase in a permanent workplace) where a person could be injured by falling from it, even if it is at or below ground level.

The Work at Height Regulations apply to all work at height where there is a risk of a fall liable to cause personal injury. They place duties on employers and the self-employed.

Some examples of activities covered by the Regulations include:

Click here for the safe at work information sheet.

A Safety Statement Will Make You Sigh With Relief

Safety Statements in the workplace 

What is a safety statement?

A safety statement is a company’s commitment in writing to a safe and healthy workplace.

The Safety statement is a legal requirement under the Safety Health & Welfare at Work Act 2005.

Section 20 of the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005 requires that an organisation produce a written programme to safeguard:

The Safety Statement should influence all work activities, including

The Safety Statement must be site specific and be based on a written risk assessment. It cannot be generic and must be communicated in a form manner and language that is likely to be understood by all concerned.

What are the benefits of having a safety statement?

An organisation will see benefits such as,

* An insurance company may refuse cover if you do not have a valid safety statement

Who should have a safety statement?

All employers, self-employed persons and sole traders

How often should it be reviewed?

At least annually or in the event of changes to the business operations, personnel or working environment.

If you want to get Safety Statement Certified and be complaint with regulations click here